Home Interior Colors

How to Easily Synchronize Your Home Interior with the Seasons of the Year

The color of pillows can be used to connect your home decor with the season of the year. The result is a warm and inviting space for entertaining and relaxing because the home’s interior is synchronized with the mood and weather outside.

Nothing feels better than a home that has colors that match the season. So, enhance the entire look of your home by matching it to the season using a simple method of changing out pillows. When your guests walk in, they will feel a strong level of comfort, but, not quite understand why. You will know that the color palette you are displaying through the pillows is causing a synchronization of your guests mood with your home.

Each season has a color palette, as depicted in this Pinterest Pin. Although this article relates the colors of the season to a person’s skin tone, we can extract the same guidelines for our home.

Spring is a beautiful color palette, that is warm and fresh echoing growth and rebirth. While Summer is soft, cool and calm relating to the lazy days of the mid-year. Autumn is warm and rich followed by Winter that is bold, cool and crisp.

The challenge is to pick colors that match the season while at the same time not clashing with the color of the couch, bed or bench that you are accenting with the pillows. To help with this, we suggest you refer back to our previous posts on how to use a color wheel.

As we stated in Choosing the Colors in Your World – part one: Imagination, “People often make the mistake of choosing something (a couch, a pillow) because they like its color, but they don’t stop to consider if it will look good in its surrounding. If you are redoing everything, plan a color palette.”

After you have identified your color, look at the color directly across the wheel from it. This opposing Color Wheelcolor on the wheel is known as the complimentary color. It has the highest contrast to the first color. The further you move around the wheel and away from your color the less similarity they have.

Here’s a page that explains basic color theory to teachers of school kids from Donna Young’s Exploring Color Theory. Or, for those who like academic studies, check out the Dimensions of Colour from David Briggs.

So, you can use the colors of the season to create a warm and comfortable place for your guests and your family by merely using pillows as accent pieces. The base colors of the season are chosen first followed by complimentary colors using the Color Wheel appropriately. But do not stress trying to be scientifically perfect. Use the guidelines as nothing more than guidelines, while you use your own preference and intuitive feelings to create a mood in your home that people will not want to leave.

If you need further assistance on pillow selection, visit the AddvantageUSA online store and see our excellent selection.

 

Pouf from AddvantageUSA

What’s the Difference between a Pouf, an Ottoman, and a Hassock?

Until recently, most of us probably didn’t know the difference between a pouf and a puff. Today, poufs are an essential fashion item for many home decorators. The pouf may have a funny name, but it is useful because it (1) is versatile, (2) comes in shapes and sizes to fit almost any space, and (3) has as many colors, textures, patterns, and weaves as there are upholstery fabrics.pouf

Pouf is defined by the British Dictionary as “a large solid cushion, usually cylindrical or cubic in shape, used as a seat.” It is derived from the French word, “pouffe,” which has the same meaning.pouf

Poufs have great utility. As chairs, they can be easily moved around a room to add an extra seat wherever needed. Placed in front of your favorite sofa or chair, they also make a great footrest. They are also used as tabletops, especially if you keep a flat wood surface handy. Simply lay the wood on top to make a serving table.

poufBecause they are ordinarily much smaller than an upholstered chair, poufs make good accent pieces for your home furnishings. Select a bright color combination, and they will light up your room. On the other hand, with the right muted color a pouf will blend perfectly with your décor, and you will only notice it when you need it.

Now, back to our first question. What is the difference between a Pouf, an Ottoman, a Hassock, and a footstool? First, the typical footstool is made of wood. Though it may be used much like a pouf, the footstool is designed as a short step to reach up in cabinets and closets.  It is not really meant to be a comfortable place to sit.ottoman

The typical ottoman is a low seat made with wooden legs, a wooden box frame, and a cushioned top. Unlike the soft pillowy look of a pouf, the ottoman tends to look like what we might call “real furniture.” It is harder to make it blend. You would not put one in a corner and forget about it when it was not in use.

The hassock is more similar to the pouf than is the ottoman. However, the hassock was originally conceived as a kneeler or footstool. The true hassock, then, is shorter and smaller than a pouf. Over the course of time the word hassock has become more often associated with the utility of a pouf, and often the words can be used interchangeably to describe the same thing.

Take a look at the AddvantageUSA selection of poufs. See if the pouf would be right for your den, entertainment room, or kid’s bedroom. While you are at it, you might also want to take a look at earlier posts about color. These may help you choose the perfect poufs for your home.

Woman with color

Using the Color Wheel When Choosing Color Combinations

When choosing color you may want to start by doing a few things with the color wheel.

Almost everyone has seen a color wheel. Many children are given examples in elementary school, and this may be the last time we looked at one. Other than artists and designers, few of us ever take time to study the wheel in-depth.  However, a little practice with the color wheel will help you learn the ways that colors speak, especially the harmony (or dissonance) of two or more colors.  This can be a great help when you prepare for design and decorating projects.

After you have identified your color, look at the color directly across the wheel from it. This opposing Color Wheelcolor on the wheel is known as the complimentary color. It has the highest contrast to the first color. An example of the use of complimentary colors would be Vincent van Gogh’s Noon: Rest from work.

Look at the colors to the left and right of your color on the color wheel; these are known as analogous colors, meaning they are similar. An example of the use of analogous colors would be Edward Hopper’s Compartment C, Car 293.

The further you move around the wheel and away from your color the less similarity they have. Think of the closest ones as brothers and sisters, and moving around the wheel you meet cousins, neighbors, then acquaintances from out-of-town. Finally, when you get to the opposing color, you might think of it as a complete stranger to the first.

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Color Wheel

Choosing the Colors in Your World – part one: Imagination

If you are thinking of redecorating your home, take time to reflect on the colors you might choose.

People often make the mistake of choosing something (a couch, a pillow) because they like its color, but they don’t stop to consider if it will look good in its surrounding. If you are redoing everything, plan a color palette. Then start with a favorite large object, for example, countertops, fireplace stones, or a large rug. Use the thing you pick as a reference and work from there.

Color WheelThe visual world enters our imagination in “living color.” The things we see may be big, small, round, square, flat, near or far. But, they are also red, blue, yellow, magenta, ochre and Chartreuse. Color is so essential to us that we express non-visual ideas through it. The blue portion may be the hottest part of the flame, but we say things are red-hot. Are you a little down? Then you’re feeling kinda blue. Coveting something? You are green with envy.

The Chicago School of Media Theory states “The word “color” refers to a basic and nearly immediate property by which something presents itself to its audience. Nearly every sensuous medium possesses, produces, or inspires a sense of color.”

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